Notetakers

Notetakers produce a set of notes for people who can’t take their own because they are lipreading or watching a sign language interpreter. They can be used in work situations such as a meeting, training courses and at other work-related events.

Hands typing on keyboard

What are the different types of notetaking?

 

Electronic

  • Electronic notetakers take notes on a laptop. Most use two devices – one for the notetaker and one for the person with hearing loss (the user). The operator types a summary of what’s being said into the computer and the text appears on the user’s screen. This allows the user to interact with the operator and add their own notes. It’s up to the user, not the notetaker, to decide what they want to keep. Or they can just take notes directly on their own laptop and pass them over to the user afterwards.
  • Electronic notetaking doesn’t produce a full verbatim (word for word) account of what’s been said. If this is what you need, you should use a speech-to-text reporting service.

Manual notetaking

  • A manual notetaker is trained to take clear notes in handwritten English – they’re often used in educational settings.

Notetakers need regular breaks, and you shouldn’t expect them to work through lunch and coffee breaks. If the event is longer than two hours, you should book two notetakers.

Call us on 0333 240 5658 to book an electronic notetaker Book with us today

Stay in touch

We’d love to stay in touch about supporting your staff and customers with hearing loss. Sign up now.

Search Next image Previous image Next section Open menu Close Open Play video Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Instagram Follow us on Twitter Email us Follow us on Youtube